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posted 10 Mar 2004, 03:03 in Author Q & AHello to the author and everyone... by Vanarys, Commoner

Ah ok, could someone post the link to this OWW forum? I usually ask that writing question of every author I run into, the reason being is that, I have a tendency to start world-building when I get bored, as I find it to be a relaxing and creative process. But when I sit down and actually start to translate that material into a story is when I run into problems. For e.g. I have had a setting and world set up for about a year now, but as of today, I still haven't finished even a word of the actual story. I come up with a few paragraphs and end up deleting it all eventually to start over because I think it doesn't read well or because my writing sucks or because it's just not a good enough beginning. Repeat that process over and over again. Blah. Sometimes I think I can't ever finish even a short story, I have no clue how some people can just sit down and write and write and write... Enough of my whining. Btw, is TTT the last book in the prince of nothing series? view post


posted 10 Mar 2004, 05:03 in The Thousandfold ThoughtThe Title by Vanarys, Commoner

Another vote for TTT. Sounds cool. :) view post


posted 10 Mar 2004, 05:03 in Off-Topic DiscussionOS's and Browsers by Clarkesworld Books, Peralogue

I've grown to prefer Linux over windows. My background is actually in computer science, so I've been using a variety of unix-variants for a long time. I do a lot of coding in PHP and web design as well. I'm currently redesigning my store via php and mysql. At my day job, I design online courses. Browser is Mozilla based. At work I have to use Windows/Netscape/IE. I avoid IE unless I am working with a customer or testing web compatibility. -Neil view post


posted 10 Mar 2004, 05:03 in Author Q & AHello to the author and everyone... by Clarkesworld Books, Peralogue

It think this is the one he is talking about: [url:lx4jcdsx]http://sff.onlinewritingworkshop.com/[/url:lx4jcdsx] -Neil view post


posted 10 Mar 2004, 05:03 in The Darkness That Comes Beforekellhus == good guy?? by Vanarys, Commoner

[quote="Mithfânion":283uns4i]Anasurimbor Kellhus has to rank up there in my all-time top three of favoriet characters. Whenever I think of him it's an image of some lone figure standing on a hill, cloak and hair blowing in the wind, ominous aura included. Just seems to fit :)[/quote:283uns4i] I completely agree Mifthânion. It annoys me that there aren't more characters like him, but that's part of his attraction I think, that unfamiliar air... view post


posted 10 Mar 2004, 07:03 in Author Q & AHello to the author and everyone... by Vanarys, Commoner

Cool, thanks Neil. Btw, I see that you have TDTCB for order on your website, do you ship to Guam? Considering that it's taken for international even though it's still US territory... *grumble* On a different tangent, what books would anyone of a philosophical bent recommend for a newbie to start with? Considering the fact that up until I read some of Mr. Bakker's posts and the TDTCB excerpt, I basically avoided any and all philosophical debates and literature as I considered it a waste of time (no offense to anyone). But against my better judgement, my interest is growing so I'll read pretty much anything, with one exception, please don't make me read anything by Aryn Rand. PLEASE, for the love of god, anything but her! ;) :? Thanks in advance. view post


posted 10 Mar 2004, 18:03 in Off-Topic DiscussionOS's and Browsers by Sovin Nai, Site Administrator

I got linux about a year ago for the first time, and absolutely loved it. It so much more customizable than windows, and refreshingly non controlling. I also love all of the programs available for free for it and the ease of setting up servers on it. What sort of courses do you design? view post


posted 10 Mar 2004, 18:03 in The Thousandfold ThoughtThe Title by Sovin Nai, Site Administrator

Come on and vote, everyone! Lets have all 30 of you vote! It's your patriotic duty! view post


posted 10 Mar 2004, 18:03 in Author Q & AHello to the author and everyone... by Sovin Nai, Site Administrator

Why not Ayn Rand? I have to read something by her for a scholarship essay I am going to write, but have never read her before. view post


posted 10 Mar 2004, 19:03 in Author Q & AHello to the author and everyone... by Cu'jara Cinmoi, Author of Prince of Nothing

Ayn Rand is a joke. Normally I'm loathe to say that of any thinker, but I've been convinced that she's nothing short of pernicious. We human beings are actually quite inept when it comes to knowledge, and quite good when it comes to duping ourselves - which is the whole reason why science requires such elaborate precautions (and still regularly trips up). We generally hate complexity, we feel threatened by uncertainty, and we love flattery. This is why you have so many different groups saying, 'We're the best X!' with such absurd conviction, where x = nation, faith, race, gender, class, and so on. The best thinkers, it seems to me, cut against these tendencies, and so challenge the status quo. The worst thinkers, such as Ayn Rand, exploit these tendencies, and end up apologizing for the status quo - or even worse, arguing for more extreme versions of it. What you end up with is a very superficial but very appealing creed. view post


posted 10 Mar 2004, 20:03 in The Thousandfold ThoughtThe Title by Wil, Head Moderator

Ah, but it's our right [b:12cfm052]NOT[/b:12cfm052] to vote. view post


posted 10 Mar 2004, 22:03 in The Thousandfold ThoughtThe Title by Sovin Nai, Site Administrator

All I'm asking is that as many people as feel comfortable vote so that we can have a better sampling. view post


posted 10 Mar 2004, 22:03 in Author Q & AHello to the author and everyone... by Sovin Nai, Site Administrator

Hmm. Thanks. I'll think about that as I read the book; I think it will make it more interesting. view post


posted 10 Mar 2004, 22:03 in The Thousandfold ThoughtThe Title by Wil, Head Moderator

Ah, but don't try to guilt-trip us into it when we make the choice to abstaine. view post


posted 11 Mar 2004, 00:03 in Author Q & AHello to the author and everyone... by Vanarys, Commoner

The above post was me btw. view post


posted 11 Mar 2004, 03:03 in Off-Topic DiscussionOS's and Browsers by Clarkesworld Books, Peralogue

[quote="Sovin Nai":xuqaj1az]What sort of courses do you design?[/quote:xuqaj1az] A good portion of the courses are designed in a CMS called Blackboard. I try to expand beyond that where I can. For the most part I'm working directly with someone from the faculty. I'm also designing courses to help them learn how design for and teach in an online environment. My goal is to make my job obsolete. I'll be gone from there long before that happens though. -Neil view post


posted 11 Mar 2004, 03:03 in Author Q & AHello to the author and everyone... by Clarkesworld Books, Peralogue

[quote="Vanarys":348o9uj5]Cool, thanks Neil. Btw, I see that you have TDTCB for order on your website, do you ship to Guam? Considering that it's taken for international even though it's still US territory... *grumble* Thanks in advance.[/quote:348o9uj5] Just sold my last copy of the Canadian TPB edition and I can't find anyone willing to ship me some more. If you want to wait for the US hardcover edition, yes, I'll ship to Guam. I'm not picky about things like that. -Neil view post


posted 11 Mar 2004, 12:03 in Author Q & AHello to the author and everyone... by Cu'jara Cinmoi, Author of Prince of Nothing

A good philosophical intro... hmm. As silly as it sounds, I think the Writers and Readers 'documentary comic books' series is actually a good place to get one's bearings. What kind of questions are you interested in exploring? view post


posted 11 Mar 2004, 13:03 in Author Q & AHello to the author and everyone... by Vanarys, Commoner

[quote="Cu'jara Cinmoi":3292mi9z]A good philosophical intro... hmm. As silly as it sounds, I think the Writers and Readers 'documentary comic books' series is actually a good place to get one's bearings. What kind of questions are you interested in exploring?[/quote:3292mi9z] Hrm. Good question. I suppose anything on religion and science or neuroscience would be interesting. Btw, what is this Writers and Readers 'documentary comic books' series that you mentioned? Thanks again. view post


First post posted 11 Mar 2004, 15:03 in The Thousandfold ThoughtThe Title by MagnanimousOne, Candidate

Alright - you guilt-tripped me into my first post. WSS sounds like a summer camp. OK, that would be a pretty cool summer camp but still... view post


posted 11 Mar 2004, 17:03 in Off-Topic DiscussionOS's and Browsers by Sovin Nai, Site Administrator

So you're talking about online university course type of things? view post


posted 11 Mar 2004, 17:03 in The Thousandfold ThoughtThe Title by Sovin Nai, Site Administrator

I'm NOT. Trying to guilt trip that is. Hey MagnanimousOne! Glad you have started posting. Sorry all, but I realized this poll had some problematic elements, so I scratched it and started over. Sorry to those of you who had already voted, but there are other options now you may choose and which may encourage other, more reticent voters, to vote. view post


posted 12 Mar 2004, 01:03 in Off-Topic DiscussionOS's and Browsers by Clarkesworld Books, Peralogue

Yes, they are university-level courses. Mostly undergraduate, but there are a few at the graduate level. Most of the classes offered at the university are traditional in the classroom or a mix of classroom and online. A smaller percentage are totally online. -Neil view post


posted 12 Mar 2004, 18:03 in Author Q & AHello to the author and everyone... by Cu'jara Cinmoi, Author of Prince of Nothing

They're introductory texts highlighting the basics of different thinkers in a quasi graphic novel format. To be honest, I'm not even sure they're publishing them anymore. I found them immensely useful as an undergrad. view post


posted 12 Mar 2004, 22:03 in Off-Topic DiscussionOS's and Browsers by Sovin Nai, Site Administrator

What university do you work for? Or do you work for a company that works for various universities? view post


Welcome and Guidelines posted 12 Mar 2004, 22:03 in Member Written WorksWelcome and Guidelines by Sovin Nai, Site Administrator

Welcome to the new writing exchange forum. Here is how it will work: If you have a piece you would like to discuss, begin a NEW thread titled preferably with the name of your piece. In your first post, introduce your piece, give any necessary background information or the like, and ATTACH your work. DO NOT copy it into a post, as it will make people's eyes fall out in agony and give us a huge database. After reading someone else's work, comment on it by replying to their post. Please do not start other threads about the same piece of work, the idea being to have one thread per story, poem, what-have-you. Respond politely and constructively in a helpful manner. If a topic comes up in a discussion that drifts from the piece to a general literary topic, start a thread in the Writing Techniques forum. Any commentary regarding the function of this forum is to be posted as a reply to this announcement. ALL WORK IS ASSUMED TO BE THE PROPERTY OF THE POSTER AND NO POSTED WORK MAY BE STOLEN OR POSTED ELSEWHERE WITHOUT DUE CREDIT AND PERMISSION FROM THE AUTHOR. view post


Welcome posted 12 Mar 2004, 22:03 in Writing TipsWelcome by Sovin Nai, Site Administrator

This is a forum in which to exchange strategies and other fun writing tips. DO NOT POST WORK HERE, save it for the works section. view post


World-building posted 13 Mar 2004, 03:03 in Writing TipsWorld-building by Wil, Head Moderator

I am working on building a world for a story idea. But I have no idea where to start. Does anyone have a good suggestion for creating maps? Is it best to hand draw them or is there a cartography program that works? What about the laws of geography. Any suggestions would be great! view post


posted 13 Mar 2004, 12:03 in Writing TipsWorld-building by Kellais, Commoner

First off, thanks guys for doing this! Concerning maps: I really love maps. I draw a lot of maps and if I do, I draw it with my own hands. There is at least one decent tool to draw maps IMO. The tool's name is Campaign Cartographer and is from ProFantasy software. For a look, go to this adress www.profantasy.com . On laws of geography: If you want to make a map based on real geographical influences that is much more work and is connected to a lot of research... What I DO look for is that at least the climatic-zones are not too ridiculously set. I don't want to have rainforest and 2 miles to the east a huge desert, that just doesn't make sense IMO. Ok, that's it for now... Kellais view post


posted 13 Mar 2004, 14:03 in Off-Topic DiscussionOS's and Browsers by Clarkesworld Books, Peralogue

I'm currently working for FDU (Fairleigh Dickenson University) in Madison, NJ. I'll probably be somewhere else within a year. Not that it's a bad place, they just don't pay that well and this work is well below what I've done in the last university I worked for (Drew). I was Director of Academic Technology there for over 10 years. -Neil view post


Now Reading... posted 14 Mar 2004, 10:03 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by Wil, Head Moderator

I thought it would be nice to have a place for members to lett other members know what they are reading and what they think of it. Let's try and keep this spoiler-free. I am about 250 pages into [i:3pgmfm7v]Gardens of the Moon[/i:3pgmfm7v] by Steven Erikson and I am loving it. A must-read (although I'm sure that most on here have read this already). I like the fact that (so far) he hasn't sat down and explained anything, that you have to learn about the world. view post


posted 14 Mar 2004, 23:03 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by Malarion, Candidate

GOTM is a great book. It gets better as it progresses (and I keep going back to it to reread certain scenes). Presently reading Erikson's latest Malazan book, "Midnight Tides", which is now building up nicely (nearly finished). Its not his best (book 3 is, imho), but its still better than most fantasy out there. Great info galore in this book. Its heavy in exposition and I'm loving it (who said expocition was a bad thing). view post


posted 14 Mar 2004, 23:03 in Writing TipsWorld-building by Malarion, Candidate

I think the only way to get the right map is to draw one, work on it, think about your story, and decide where this map works against it. Once you have done this, redraw it, go through the same procedure and keep repeating it. Its unlikely you'll get it right first time (or second etc), but its necessary. Also, before your start right down all the conditions you require for your map (key cities, countires, areas for potential battles etc). This will help guide you. And never complete it entirely. Allow blanks. You'll need the freedom to expand when you get writing. As for getting the geography right... Thats a hard one. How hard depends on the scale of your map. If you're drawing the whole world then its a difficult problem. If its just an area then the task is a little easier. Perhaps the best start is to work out the direction of the prevailing rains. From there you should be able to work out what areas are wet and what are dry etc. Hope this helps. view post


posted 14 Mar 2004, 23:03 in Interviews and ReviewsMore laudations... this time from a very important group by Malarion, Candidate

A fantastic result for a first book. Bakker is on his way to joining Erikson and Martin (and deservedly so, imho). view post


Great News - and please post what work you are all doing. posted 15 Mar 2004, 00:03 in Writing TipsGreat News - and please post what work you are all doing. by Malarion, Candidate

Just thought I'd say thanks. I hope to post some of my stuff once you free this section up (and a brilliant choice for the method of posting - I hate it when its pasted onto the forum). Hope we get something going with this, and I'll give what help I can (and hopefully Bakker can lend us his wisdom :wink: ). I've written 43 chapters of my first book (still being editted) and I'm on the 10th of book 2. Book 1 (like most fantasy these days) is only the first part of my tale. Book 1 - "A Faceless Shadow" Book 2 - "Champions of Carnage" view post


posted 15 Mar 2004, 17:03 in Writing TipsGreat News - and please post what work you are all doing. by Sovin Nai, Site Administrator

Champions of Carnage seems a bit heavy. That was just my initial reaction, anyway. I like it, but think that some people could be a bit turned off by it. view post


posted 16 Mar 2004, 02:03 in Writing TipsGreat News - and please post what work you are all doing. by Malarion, Candidate

Hehe. Doubtlessly if I somehow convince someone into publishing these stories the publisher will decide the titles for me aka LOTR's trilogy. Its a working title and might (like everything else) change. Anyway, who else is writing something and what's it called? view post


posted 16 Mar 2004, 04:03 in Writing TipsGreat News - and please post what work you are all doing. by Wil, Head Moderator

I have some stuff going, but I can never think of a good title. *sigh* of course I can never get past the first ten pages... view post


posted 16 Mar 2004, 05:03 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by Clarkesworld Books, Peralogue

I'm currently reading Neil Gaiman's Adventures in the Dream Trade and just finished Tim Lebbon's Changing of Faces. CoF is a followup to the Naming of Parts novella and is every bit as good. If you like horror, Lebbon is a writer you need to check out. -Neil view post


posted 16 Mar 2004, 12:03 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by Voland, Candidate

Currently reading Carter beats the Devil by Glen David Gold, as well as Liveship Traders by Robin Hobb. Struggling a bit with Liveship but I want to finish that trilogy before I move on to the Golden Fool. view post


posted 16 Mar 2004, 16:03 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by Sovin Nai, Site Administrator

I just started The Fencing Master, which is not fantasy at all, but oh well. Voland, how are you struggling with the Liveship Traders? Are you having problems getting into the plot, or following the story, or what? I'm just curious, because I think they might be my favorite works RH has done. I would like to hear your opinion. view post


posted 18 Mar 2004, 06:03 in Member Written WorksWelcome and Guidelines by Sovin Nai, Site Administrator

Well, after a rather bumpy ride we got the attachment function working. This forum is now unlocked and open for business. Please, begin posting your writing and become better authors. Sorry about the few days of downtime. view post


posted 18 Mar 2004, 13:03 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by LooseCannon, Peralogue

I had the same problem with Liveship Traders. I read it off and on for a month and finally gave up. I just couldn't get interested in the so-so plot. I am sure I will eventually return to it at some point. Also, I have been struggling to get into Otherland: The Mountain of Black Glass. Just don't have the time I need at the moment to read so it is hard to get into books, I guess. Been about eight months since I read the previous novel in the Otherland series. Just finished Midnight Tides about two weeks ago (no trouble getting into this one!), and as Mal said, it was very good although MoI is probably still the best in the series. Erikson's series is definately at the top of the genre right now. Of course Bakker's series is looking like it might take a run for the title if the first book is any indication ;). view post


The Series That Comes After? posted 18 Mar 2004, 13:03 in Author Q & AThe Series That Comes After? by LooseCannon, Peralogue

Hi Scott, I was just wondering what your plans are after you finish the PoN series? Are you planning to stick to the basic fantasy genre or are you going to delve into other stuff? If so can you give us any indication on what we might be in for later on down the line? view post


posted 18 Mar 2004, 13:03 in The Darkness That Comes Beforekellhus == good guy?? by LooseCannon, Peralogue

@Sovin and Mal - He does indeed say he is on his way to kill his father, but he says it to Nauir and we are reading from Nauir's POV at that moment. So, you probably have a valid point there as I don't think Kellhus actually thinks to himself about killing his father anywhere else in the books. Regardless I am unsure if he will be able to kill his father. I imagine some sort of Darth Vader/Luke Skywalker encounter in the WP ;). view post


posted 18 Mar 2004, 15:03 in Philosophy DiscussionOn The Warrior Prophet by Replay, Auditor

[quote:284cpxn6]I would have to say yes, all morality is just a social construct. However, that doesn't demean it in any way, to my thinking.[/quote:284cpxn6] I think this is quite a common argument made by many these days, and it is very easy to see how people come to such a conclusion. The problem comes when you try to lump all of morality (or value which morality is an extension of), into one group. Whereas in reality is does not really work like that. By looking at morality from only a social point of view, you miss the morality/value of the intellect. And if you look at it from only an intellectual point a view, you can miss the social (and then theres the biological and inorganic etc). For instance, theres been talk of whether animals have morality/value. Well, from an intellectual--and to a smaller extent, social--it may seem that they dont. But from a biological? Well thats another matter. Does not an animal do all it can to survive? And are not those who do survive those of biological higher value? I guess you could say that is what the whole survival of the fittest is about (though perhaps a better name would be survival of the best, or even survival of the highest value). From this i guess you could say that evolution is just a movement to higher forms of value. Which brings up and interesting point, and that is that value is not a fixed thing (well, in the relative world anyway). I suppose this is the cause of most of the problems when you try to define it (i certainly had a lot of problems just typing out this small post on the subject). view post


Pantoum posted 18 Mar 2004, 16:03 in Member Written WorksPantoum by Wil, Head Moderator

I thought that I would start this out by putting one of my poems that I have written recently on here. It dosen't have a title, and it is written in the pantoum style. view post


posted 18 Mar 2004, 16:03 in Author Q & AThe Series That Comes After? by Cu'jara Cinmoi, Author of Prince of Nothing

Ah, the question I've been dreading. In the first few months of 2003 I took some time out to write a sleek little near-future psychothriller called Neuropath, which I intend to buff and polish once I finish TTT. I started NP thinking I needed a break from writing fantasy, only to discover that fantasy writing is, well... So much more damn fun! So NP is next, hot on the heels of TTT. What comes after NP? The Aspect-Emperor, another trilogy which returns to the demented cast (those that survive, that is) of PON some twenty years later. More than a few people groan when I say this, which is why I always feel the need to explain myself! First, I conceived and roughed out the greater cycle of stories (as a trilogy of trilogies) the year before WoT came out, so this is most definitely not a case of me slavishly following commercial precedents. This means, secondly, that every book in the series is motivated by STORY, and not money (if there is any in this business!) Third, PON is a complete tale, and not merely the first third of one. The relationship of AE to PON is more akin to the relationship between the Dune books, though the narrative arc that binds them - the story of the Second Apocalypse - is, I like to think, less ad hoc than Herbert's. As strange as it sounds, I look at PON as my version of The Hobbit. view post


posted 18 Mar 2004, 16:03 in The Darkness That Comes Beforekellhus == good guy?? by Sovin Nai, Site Administrator

I think the only information about Kellhus we can assume to be true is that which comes from his POV. view post


posted 18 Mar 2004, 16:03 in Author Q & AThe Series That Comes After? by Sovin Nai, Site Administrator

That is very exciting, to think about the relationship between The Hobbit and LoTR and then apply that to what we are reading now. Scott, have you read any of the Farseer, Liveship Trader, or Tawny Man trilogies by Robin Hobb? They follow the cycle of trilogies format, and I really like it. It is also exciting to think about this website ten years down the road, with a huge member base and tons of forums. view post


posted 18 Mar 2004, 16:03 in Philosophy DiscussionOn The Warrior Prophet by Sovin Nai, Site Administrator

Welcome to the board, Replay. Yes, morality and value would be a changing concept. I am arguing that from where morality is derived is irrelevant. We must acknowledge it as a necessary facet of life. It smooths out human interaction and gives members of a society a common frame of reference. But, by acknowledging that morality is not a concrete system, we can liberate ourselves from the who's right/wrong argument and acknowledge differing moral beliefs as personal problems and not religious. view post


posted 18 Mar 2004, 17:03 in Author Q & AThe Series That Comes After? by Arakasi, Commoner

Yeah I was curious about that as well. I've sort of got used to the idea that an author tends to stay in one world. It seems all the major fantasy writers are doing it these days. Like Erikson, Martin, Jordan, etc. It's funny to hear the first book (and series) referred to as the hobbit though. *lol* But that is cool since I'll be able to read more from this interesting world. view post


posted 18 Mar 2004, 17:03 in Author Q & AFew Questions by Arakasi, Commoner

I just have a couple questions on the books here. I enjoyed the first one a lot and will likely do a reread before the second book comes in. Anyways to my questions. 1. I read that you're going to do three triologies set in the same world. But at the same time you're going to have each wrap up. Does this mean mostly wrap up, because if you do a complete wrap up like most authors do, wouldn't it be hard to start again in the same world in only 20 years? 2. Are you going to explore more of the world? Or is the continent we see on the map the only one. Or will you go over the seas so to speak. view post


posted 18 Mar 2004, 17:03 in Philosophy DiscussionOn The Warrior Prophet by Replay, Auditor

Yes, the i-am-right-you-are-wrong attitude is one of biggest causes of problems in the world today. But people love to set ideas and truths in concrete and cling on to them. I guess its a way to try and fend off the uncertainty of the world. The thing is though, its in that uncertainty that true learning comes. Knowing that you can never have all the facts and that logic is not infallible, you can easily accept that what you hold true now, may not be so. You are not only open to any new information that comes along, but also open to the wonder of the world as it unfolds, instead of trying to force it into something else (which in the end never works). p.s. I dont really agree with you that this is not a religious issue. This topic is at the very heart of religion. But then yours and my idea of what religion is probably differs quite a bit. view post


posted 18 Mar 2004, 18:03 in Author Q & AThe Series That Comes After? by LooseCannon, Peralogue

Interesting response! Not sure what to make of the comparison to the Hobbit. Are you implying that the next trilogy will focus on an even more epic plotline than the current one and that PON is just an introductory story into this world? That boggles my tiny little mind if that is the case. view post


posted 18 Mar 2004, 22:03 in Philosophy DiscussionOn The Warrior Prophet by Sovin Nai, Site Administrator

What I mean by not a religious issue is that by accepting that we don't have the absolute truth we can allow other religions or lack of religion to exist peacefully without the need to "make them see the truth." I am not saying that these are not religious beliefs, but I see how that was unclear in my last post, sorry. view post


Administrator Vacation posted 18 Mar 2004, 22:03 in General AnnouncementsAdministrator Vacation by Sovin Nai, Site Administrator

Wil and I, the founders and admins of this site, will both be gone to different places in Mexico with our families over spring break. This being the case, if anything goes horribly wrong or falls apart we won't be hear to deal with it. Hopefully everything will be smooth sailing, and I at least will do what I can to log in from Mexico at a cyber cafe or some similar location. We should both be back Saturday the 27 of March. view post


posted 18 Mar 2004, 23:03 in Philosophy DiscussionOn The Warrior Prophet by Replay, Auditor

Ah i see what you mean. Yes, that has been a problem with alot of religions over the years (not all though), and it is probably one of the major causes for people turning away from it. It certainly turned me away from Christianty, what with all the dogma and asking you to accept their word as law just on faith. Funny thing is, it was that turning away and looking at other religions that finally allow me to understand Christianity alot better. It's not all that bad a religion once you cut away most of the crap (if your interested, you might want to check out some of stuff by the Christian mystics on the web). Plus from speaking to a couple of Christians lately, i think things are changing. They didnt seem so interested following the dogma layed out for them, and instead were investigating reality for themselves (or getting in contact with face of god as they like to call it). Guess that's that evolution at work again. view post


posted 19 Mar 2004, 11:03 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by Voland, Candidate

I can't really say. I'm having some trouble with the ...gah, what's his name...the boy on the Vivacia, something with W iirc...storyline. Maybe I'm just afraid for him, since RH wasn't very nice to poor Fitz :D. I'll get around to it eventually, I like the book. view post


posted 19 Mar 2004, 16:03 in Author Q & AFew Questions by Cu'jara Cinmoi, Author of Prince of Nothing

Hi Akrasi. The stories are nested within a greater narrative. What I mean is that each trilogy (as opposed to each book within the trilogy) will have a complete story to tell. At the same time, each trilogy will also tell part of a much, much larger story. Though most everything happens within Earwa, so things do spill in from the outside. I actually think 'global world-building' is something of a mistake in creating fantasy worlds. One of the primary features of ancient understandings of the world, I think, is the incompleteness of that understanding. This is one of the things Tolkien does so well - even in the name 'Middle-earth': he conjures the sense of civilization encircled by mystery and darkness. view post


posted 19 Mar 2004, 16:03 in Author Q & AThe Series That Comes After? by Cu'jara Cinmoi, Author of Prince of Nothing

Ten years! Maybe I should think about this... In answer to your question, Sovin, Robin Hobb has been on my must read list for some time. Any suggestions as to where I should start? In answer to your question, Loosecannon, yes, the scope does become more 'epic,' though in ways that might be surprising. The story is BIG. view post


My Book - A Faceless Shadow posted 19 Mar 2004, 17:03 in Member Written WorksMy Book - A Faceless Shadow by Malarion, Candidate

Ok, I'll post up the first chapter of my first book. Let me know what you all think. I'm a would-be and as yet unpublished author, so don't be too cruel on me (although if you think it all a pile of crap, let me know why). :) view post


posted 19 Mar 2004, 17:03 in Writing TipsGreat News - and please post what work you are all doing. by Malarion, Candidate

I used to hit the magic 100 pages before losing heart and scrapping it all. It actually took the inspiration of changing who was the main character to get the ball rolling. I've never looked back (ok, I'v looked back occasionally, but never to give in). view post


posted 19 Mar 2004, 18:03 in Author Q & AThe Series That Comes After? by Voland, Candidate

Sounds really interesting. But I'll refrain from thinking about that...I'm old enough as it is...any long looks into the future (3+ years) is kinda scary hehe. But I'll take as much from Earwa as you can throw at me. :D As for Hobb....Start with the Farseer trilogy (Assassin's Apprentice, Royal Assassin, Assassin's quest) then Liveship (Ship of Magic, Mad Ship (???), Ship of Destiny) then Tawny Man (Fool's Errand, Golden Fool, Fool's Quest). At least, that's what I'm trying to do....altho I cheated a little bit. Read Fool's Errand before I started Liveship, altho I'm reading the Livehsip ones before I start with the rest of Tawny Man. Kinda hard since I liked FE much more than I like Ship of Magic (Even if it is good). view post


posted 19 Mar 2004, 21:03 in Author Q & AThe Series That Comes After? by Wil, Head Moderator

I suggest reading Hobb from beginning to end. It's the only way that everything will make sense. A lot of people skip Liveship, and I think that is a really bad idea. They may not seem it, but they are key to the story. Read Farsser Trilogy, Liveship Traders, then Tawneyman. view post


posted 20 Mar 2004, 20:03 in Author Q & AThe Series That Comes After? by Mithfânion, Didact

[i:ou39zp08]In answer to your question, Sovin, Robin Hobb has been on my must read list for some time. Any suggestions as to where I should start? [/i:ou39zp08] Assasin's Apprentice, as others have stated. It's the first one and also one of the best things she's ever written, either as Hobb or as Lindholm. The Farseer/Tawny Man trilogies are nothing short of brilliant. Wonderful character studies above all, the plot tends to be a bit thin (for epic Fantasy), but she creates a great atmosphere and her magic is diferent and interesting both. I thought the Liveship books displayed a distinct drop in quality though. While you may at least want to give them a try before moving on to Tawny Man, they are not necessary. Some stuff from Liveship does spill in to Tawny Man, but you can definitly read Tawny Man without any problems if you've only read Farseer. Anyway, interesting news about the other series, thought that is still a long way off. [/i] view post


The LOTR Films posted 21 Mar 2004, 04:03 in Off-Topic DiscussionThe LOTR Films by Malarion, Candidate

Ok, just wondered what the views of the people on this forum were towards these films (and Scott's, if he's reading). Personally I was pleasantly surprised. The first film blew me away completely. I felt a lump in my throat by the care I saw put into this film. Fantasy (which means everything to me) was finally getting the respect it deserved. Ok, I can hear the complaints. The story wandered from the book etc. But still...think how it could have been. Iain McKellan was absolutely amazing as Gangalf. I cannot image that character now without his face. It was perfect. Saruman? Lee was immense. So many good actors playing the part, not the actor (aka Stallone etc). My only real anger were this (and it revealed Jackson's abilities - great film maker but victim of poor storytelling - and these weaknesses plagued the book too). It suffered from a lack of a strong villian. The Witch-King was very much underplayed. The scene when he rises from behind the dead Fell Beast was amazing...but too late. We'd not gotten to know this monster, so we never cared about his death. In fact, the entire Wraith thing was pretty badly handled (and in some ways, I blam JRR himself). The search-light Sauron was fuckin annoying. Legolas pissed me off from the start. All his over-the-top scene were off putting. Still, my favourite movies of alll time. Gandalf was awesome. Gollum was mind blowing. The imagery took my breath. etc What did you all think? view post


posted 23 Mar 2004, 17:03 in Author Q & AThe Series That Comes After? by lfex, Peralogue

Hi, everybody. I was provoked into my first post by the news about the nineology - or whatever it is called? Cool. I love big series -I hasten to add I mean Martin and Erikson, not Jordan and Goodkind. You say that you had this story outlined - IIRC, you ever mentioned somewhere that the first version of it was also written, t least partially – 15 years ago? I am impressed, especially that you seem to have been a teenager then. This Neuropaths thing also seem interesting. When it is going to be published? view post


posted 23 Mar 2004, 19:03 in Author Q & AThe Series That Comes After? by Cu'jara Cinmoi, Author of Prince of Nothing

Thanks for the Hobb advice everyone. I suspect Amazon thanks you as well... Welcome aboard Ifex! I do have a finished draft of PON, which I completed at the beginning of the eighties - back when I had far more ideas than ability. I only have outlines of the rest of the story, however. As far as NP goes, TTT takes precedence, but with any luck I should have something for my agent to shop around by late this year or early next. Just when it'll hit the shelves probably depends on how well PON is doing. view post


posted 25 Mar 2004, 17:03 in Member Written WorksMy Book - A Faceless Shadow by Ilnaulro, Commoner

:lol: Mr Malarion is being too modest. I am not here to drum up business for him, however, I have read this story and recommend it. Just hink, one day you will see it on the bookshelf and say: "I read that before it was published" and you will be Sooooo popular on the fans forum dedicated to him. Read it. view post


posted 25 Mar 2004, 18:03 in Writing TipsGreat News - and please post what work you are all doing. by Ilnaulro, Commoner

8) I too am currently about a third or so of the way through my second book (of a projected four) whilst re-writing book one (as always). I have sent off my synopsis and sample chapters to a couple of publishers, so here's hoping. I will refrain from posting up atm, but I am more than willing to read and give feedback from anything anyone else has to offer. Also, as a pedantic writer who has done mountains of research into this "art" I will be happy to help and give any advice I can. Book One - Faith (took about six years) Book Two - Requiescat (in progress at a faster rate ;)) view post


posted 25 Mar 2004, 18:03 in Writing TipsWorld-building by Ilnaulro, Commoner

I prefer to hand-draw my maps too, but whatever works for you. What I would say, is to take your time and really work at the map and enjoy it, because, just like in RL, the actual geography shapes the lives of those who live there. Also, it IS a plot device. Anyway, there are stacks of websites out there you can find easily with all sorts of builders, from characters, taverns and names to whole worlds (and all of these can give you ideas and plots) Enjoy. view post


posted 25 Mar 2004, 20:03 in Off-Topic DiscussionNow Reading... by Edge, Peralogue

I'm torn between Dan Simmons [i:130wyefo] Illium [/i:130wyefo] and Alastair Reynolds [i:130wyefo] Absolution Gap [/i:130wyefo] at the moment. view post


posted 25 Mar 2004, 20:03 in Off-Topic DiscussionHow did you get here? by Edge, Peralogue

Another Malazanite who followed your link. view post


posted 25 Mar 2004, 20:03 in Off-Topic DiscussionOS's and Browsers by Edge, Peralogue

I'm using IE 6 as my browser. Dunno if I'd go so far as to say I prefer it. Just too lazy to change it. :) view post


posted 25 Mar 2004, 20:03 in The Darkness That Comes Beforekellhus == good guy?? by Edge, Peralogue

I found it impossible to like Kellhus. He's aloof and manipulative. As for whose side is he on, his own. I think he would be quite happy to side with either "good" or "bad" factions to get his own way. But we still don't know for a fact what exactly he wants, if he is going to join his father or kill him. view post


posted 26 Mar 2004, 00:03 in Off-Topic DiscussionHow did you get here? by Ilnaulro, Commoner

:oops: From Malazan also...but not from a link, it was because so many people had nothing but good things to say about Bakker. :lol: view post


posted 27 Mar 2004, 21:03 in Off-Topic DiscussionOS's and Browsers by Sovin Nai, Site Administrator

You really should try Mozilla or Firefox at www.mozilla.org view post


posted 27 Mar 2004, 21:03 in Writing TipsGreat News - and please post what work you are all doing. by Sovin Nai, Site Administrator

Requiescat? view post


posted 27 Mar 2004, 21:03 in Author Q & AThe Series That Comes After? by Sovin Nai, Site Administrator

May I state, as a devout Hobb follower, that you MUST read the books in order, and all of them. The tawny man trilogy will make sense but so much will be lost. Bits of innuendo and character developement and the rich complexity of intertwined tales, which are the true beauty of Hobb`s works will be gone. Sorry about that, but I feel quite strongly. view post


posted 27 Mar 2004, 21:03 in Philosophy DiscussionOn The Warrior Prophet by Sovin Nai, Site Administrator

I think the most important factor is to accept that your religion is personal and ensure that it is really personal. You must believe what you believe because it is how you feel and not for any other reasons, such as societal pressures, or because thats how you were raised. To many people don´t know why they believe what they claim to believe. view post


posted 29 Mar 2004, 07:03 in Member Written WorksMy Book - A Faceless Shadow by Wil, Head Moderator

Read it. Liked it. Want to read more. It was good, I'm interested in seeing where it goes. view post


posted 30 Mar 2004, 22:03 in Member Written WorksMy Book - A Faceless Shadow by Malarion, Candidate

It's going slowly. :wink: 43 chapters in book 1 and 13 chapters done in book 2 and can I see the end? :twisted: :roll: Glad you liked it. I'll post chapter 2 and a map (if I can). view post


posted 30 Mar 2004, 22:03 in Member Written WorksMy Book - A Faceless Shadow by Malarion, Candidate

And the map... well, a link to it. [url:1pnuk26n]http://www.gazler.com/users/malarion/downloadmap.jpg[/url:1pnuk26n] view post


posted 30 Mar 2004, 23:03 in Writing TipsGreat News - and please post what work you are all doing. by Malarion, Candidate

A prayer for the souls of the dead, I think. view post


posted 31 Mar 2004, 09:03 in Author Q & AHello to the author and everyone... by Loof, Peralogue

Im not realy in the know about philosofical books, but one book that an old high school (or swedish equalent) teatcher recomended but that i still havent had the chance to read (its sitting in my bookcase waiting), is "Zen and the art of motorcycle maintenance" by Robert M. Pirsig. Its not realy a philosofical text but rather a walkthrough of philosofical thinking in the form of a road trip novell. But as i said i havent read it myself yet so if anybody here has do comment... view post


The conditioning of Kellhus posted 31 Mar 2004, 14:03 in Author Q & AThe conditioning of Kellhus by Euron, Commoner

Hi everyone. This is my first post, though I've been lurking about, peering at you all for a little while! Just a quick question for the author if he gets a chance to look, or anyone else who has an opinion on it. First off though, I want to say how much I loved the first book! Right away it nestled comfortably behind asoiaf at the top of my list of favourite fantasy works. In fact, I'm reading it again at the moment and the things I reckon Bakker (Scott?) does even better than GRRM are mounting by the moment. Most of all I love the dirty politics and scheming in tdtcb. In particular, the personal interaction between characters trying to overpower each other is great. The contrast between what individuals say and what they mean, how they appear and how they actually feel, is probably my favourite thing about the book. The sordid mess that is the Emperor's relationship with his family is maybe the best example! Anyway, to the question. Kellhus is a great character, but I was thinking about his conditioning. I understand that the whole culture of the Dunyain is built around training mind and body. But I was wondering how Kellhus is able to read and influence men of the world so totally when his society is so separate form the rest of the world? To understand men's hopes and dreams and behaviours (down to their facial expressions) so entirely, I would have thought the Dunyain would need some exposure to those men? Otherwise, wouldn't ordinary men just seem completely alien to them? Does that make sense? Anyway, I'm interested in any opinions, and sorry for the long post! view post


posted 31 Mar 2004, 15:03 in Writing TipsGreat News - and please post what work you are all doing. by Sovin Nai, Site Administrator

Interesting. What religion does that come from? view post


posted 31 Mar 2004, 16:03 in Member Written WorksMy Book - A Faceless Shadow by Sovin Nai, Site Administrator

Did you have trouble posting your map or just decided to post a link? (Wondering from the perspective of troubleshooting...) view post


posted 31 Mar 2004, 16:03 in Member Written WorksMy Book - A Faceless Shadow by Malarion, Candidate

Just thought it would be a better method, given the size of the file. Didn't try to post it. view post


posted 31 Mar 2004, 18:03 in Author Q & AThe conditioning of Kellhus by Replay, Auditor

Theres an old saying that goes something like "When you understand yourself, you understand others". This would certainly be true for Kellhus who, having spent time observing his own mind in action, would come to understand how others minds work as well (though it is over exaggerated a little in the book). Deep down humans are all pretty much the same, and all our thoughts spring from the same roots (it is only the individual thoughts which are different). Once you have observed and understood them for yourself, it is easy to see how they affect others actions. So, just because the Dunyain have not been in contact with anyone for a while, it does not mean they would not understand them. The only thing they would be a bit puzzled at at first would be the other land's culture. But with a bit of observation that would soon change (as i believe it does in the book) My only problem with Kellhus is that i dont really believe he has understood these roots all that well (if he had, he would not be acting the way he is). Plus, while i understand where the author was coming from when he talking about that which comes before, if Kellhus had really understood himself, he would have had at least an idea of that which truely comes before. But hey, hes only a character in a story (and one of the best i have ever read), so these things are not really that important. view post


posted 31 Mar 2004, 18:03 in Author Q & AHello to the author and everyone... by Replay, Auditor

Zen and the art of motocycle maintenance is not so much a walkthrough of philosophical thinking, as it is an attack on it (well, on commonly held philosophy anyway). It really is a great book though, and is in easy to understand language (Prisig uses his motocycle and the relationship of its parts to explain some points, which works well). It should interest anyone wanting to learn more about philosophy, or certainly those who wish to know more about value/morality, or perhaps just life in general. I would advise reading it with an open mind though (and that also means not just accepting everything he says). Also remember that even though it is a very nice picture that he paints, it is still only a picture. p.s. If you dont want to buy it, you can find it online in many places such as [url=http://bonigv.tripod.com/toc.htm:1wracemr]here[/url:1wracemr] view post


posted 31 Mar 2004, 18:03 in Author Q & AThe conditioning of Kellhus by Cu'jara Cinmoi, Author of Prince of Nothing

Welcome, both of you! I think you've both hit upon important nerves. The problem you mention, Euron - that of Kellhus being 'too outside' to effectively gain the power he does - was one that concerned me quite a bit in TDTCB - in fact you might say the entire prologue is concerned with it (though whether it does the job or not is a different matter). Remember that Kellhus 'suffered' emotions as a child, and that he uses his perfect recollections of these as the basis of his study of the trapper, who ends up being his first world-born test case. As far as adequately understanding the roots, Replay, I think you're right. But I'll have to let Kellhus answer that one... :wink: view post


posted 31 Mar 2004, 19:03 in Author Q & AHello to the author and everyone... by Cu'jara Cinmoi, Author of Prince of Nothing

I absolutely loved the book, but I actually don't think Pirsig is that well versed in western philosophy - which is probably a good thing for the story! It really allowed the WONDER of questioning to come through - something which I think is lost in most philosophical meanderings. I thought the sequel, Lila, was horrible. Since he was arguing against as much as searching for, it screamed for a more philosophically nuanced approach. But from what I remember, it seemed that he hadn't actually read all that much. It's been awhile though. view post


posted 31 Mar 2004, 19:03 in Author Q & AThe conditioning of Kellhus by Replay, Auditor

Yes, i can understand how you'd be concerned with that. I have been working on the idea for a series over the past couple of years (its about all layed out, i just dont have the skills to write it yet), and have come across a similar problem. It has a character who, much like Kellhus, has spent years training himself and has come to certain understandings, yet has misunderstood some vital points. The question becomes how to make that misunderstanding believable (as once a person reaches a certain point in self examination, it is almost impossible for them to act in certain ways). I think that i may have worked that out for the most part, but have taken some liberties with it. After all, its is a fantasy book. p.s. Forgot to mention it before, but congratulations on such a great first book. I don't read all that much fantasy, but when i do i like it to be of very high quality, and the TDTCB certainly has that. view post


posted 31 Mar 2004, 19:03 in Author Q & AHello to the author and everyone... by Replay, Auditor

In Lila he did seem to go against what he was arguing for in the first book (not defining it, which i think he should have stuck with (though can understand why he did)). Have you checked out any of the stuff on [url=http://www.moq.org:t4lvz6ak]MOQ[/url:t4lvz6ak]? Its been a while since i last looked there, but there was some interesting stuff presented. view post


posted 31 Mar 2004, 20:03 in Author Q & AHello to the author and everyone... by Cu'jara Cinmoi, Author of Prince of Nothing

Very interesting... Though I'm not much on the metaphysics of things - apart from the sorcerous Schools that is! view post


posted 31 Mar 2004, 21:03 in Author Q & AThe conditioning of Kellhus by Cu'jara Cinmoi, Author of Prince of Nothing

There's the rub: belief (with desire) forms the basis of action, so even if it is a fantasy, you need some kind of consistency between what your characters believe and what they do - especially when their actions are extreme. I should qualify: it depends on what your goals as a writer are. For me, epic fantasy is - in an important respect - about awe (or the memory of it), and an important condition of awe is believability. If your goal is, say, the exploration of a certain 'possibility space,' then these rules need not apply. What's the founding premise? view post


posted 31 Mar 2004, 22:03 in Author Q & AThe conditioning of Kellhus by Euron, Commoner

Thanks for the replies. Interesting stuff. Thinking about the prologue, I reckon it definitely works as an illustration of how Kellhus learns to apply his skills to men of the outside world. And, of course, a lot of time passes before we see him again, during which he crosses half a continent and gathers a massive band of followers. So this would certainly give him loads of experience of handling men of the world. I wonder how much of his ability to dominate others would rely on understanding universal human emotions and their signals, and how much would rely on the context? Quite often Kellhus seems to manipulate others by knowing what it is they most desire. And I suppose this would require him to understand at least something of the culture he is working in (which will obviously change as he travels to different lands). I think this is portrayed consistently in the book, as Kellhus certainly observes and learns about cultures as he goes, and he admits that Cnaiur is still useful to him as he knows more of the world etc. view post


Ad Astra convention posted 31 Mar 2004, 22:03 in Tour and Signing InformationAd Astra convention by Wil, Head Moderator

This weekend Scott Bakker will be attending the Ad Astra convention at the Crown Plaza Hotel in Toronto. He will be doing some panals and reading some of [i:1onid0rw]The Warrior Prophet[/i:1onid0rw], he will also be signing. If you have time or are in the area, stop by. view post


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