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What is/was/will be your college major? posted 20 Jul 2004, 03:07 by Grantaire, Moderator

What degrees do you have/do you want to get? Just curious about the interests of some of the other people here. Cheers. view post


posted 20 Jul 2004, 03:07 by Wil, Head Moderator

I plan on getting a degree in Psychology then moving on to Medical School and becoming a Psychiatrist specializing in Young Adults. view post


posted 20 Jul 2004, 03:07 by Tattooed Hand, Auditor

I majored in International Studies, the humanisties/social science mishmash major at my school. Lots of flexability and no commitments. view post


posted 20 Jul 2004, 04:07 by Taliesin, Peralogue

I am currently working on a double major in English and Ancient Mediterranean Studies, and then planning to go to grad school and study something having to do with one or the other of these... who knows. I'm looking forward to spending the rest of my life in academia :wink: view post


posted 20 Jul 2004, 11:07 by DarkMatter, Peralogue

This winter I'll hopefully have a Bachleor of Science in Environmental Engineering. And I might keep studying to get a Master of Science in Environmental Engineering. view post


posted 20 Jul 2004, 12:07 by Kingslayer, Candidate

Criminal Justice Major here.... view post


posted 20 Jul 2004, 13:07 by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

BA Honors in History (University of Tennessee, 1996); MA in Modern European Cultural History (University of Tennessee, 1998); teacher certification classes, no degree (Austin Peay State University, 1999). After 5 years of teaching of one sort or the other (history/geography/government/interim English on the high school and middle levels), I decided to take a break from teaching. Currently working two jobs. One as a residential counselor in a 24-hour monitored youth treatment center for boys with emotional disturbances, the other as a part-time caretaker for people with mental disabilities. Recently decided (maybe with some help of my 30th birthday leading to some reflections) that I'd like to go back to grad school, this time to earn a MA in Counseling, with a specialization in working with teens that have been abused and who have learning/emotional difficulties as a result. With that in mind, I'll be studying again for the GRE this fall and hopefully will enroll part-time (still hoping to keep my current jobs) at probably Middle Tennessee State University in Fall 2005 to work toward that degree. So yeah, that's my college history, present, and future. Enjoy. ;) view post


posted 20 Jul 2004, 14:07 by Grantaire, Moderator

What's the GRE, Larry? view post


posted 20 Jul 2004, 14:07 by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

Graduate Record Exam The grad school version of the SAT, with the added pleasure of an extra section devoted to analogies and mind games. It's not going to be easy making the same scores this time. If I can make a 1300+ again on the Math and Verbal sections, I'll be a very happy camper. view post


posted 20 Jul 2004, 14:07 by Grantaire, Moderator

Ah. That will probably be rather tough after being out of school for so long won't it? Well I get to look forward to the SAT in the fall...I'm not sure if they're adding the new writing section or not for that one, or if that's going to be in the spring. Heh, actually I won't have to worry about that, just the math section. (math= devil. Goodkind probably invented it :wink: ) view post


posted 20 Jul 2004, 14:07 by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

The Verbal part won't be tough. In fact, I wouldn't be surprised if I improve my scores there, having had to concentrate on grammars when learning the structures of Spanish and Haitian Creole. The Math part will take about a month or two of refresher-type exercises, nothing else. Can't study much for the third part (and most schools ignore the scores there). I'm not too worried about failing to be accepted into the school I'm considering. Only question would be is if I could get a free ride. view post


posted 20 Jul 2004, 15:07 by Grantaire, Moderator

Well that's good. Best of luck to you on that exam, and on getting your degree :) So you were a history buff? Odd, I would have imagined you as being a literature major of some sort :wink: view post


posted 20 Jul 2004, 15:07 by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

I was a [i:169nh2u2]cultural[/i:169nh2u2] history student, which meant I had to take all sorts of classes on social systems, intellectual histories (which is the closest I've come to Philosophy classes, by the way), literatures, languages, even somewhat on mass psychologies. It's like being a general practitioner, except the field is very, very tough for most. It's also the history field that's most influenced by postmodernism, even if I'm not exactly a comfortable fit in that school of thought. But my main focus was religious symbolism and ideology of the Nazi era. view post


posted 20 Jul 2004, 15:07 by Grantaire, Moderator

Ah, yeah, I can definately see you as fitting that. Forgive my ignorance, but what exactly is postmodernism? I've heard you and others reference things to it, but what school of thought is it? But yeah, that field sounds pretty interesting. And for myself, I'm going to have a hell of a hard time choosing a major. Physics, chemistry, history, political science, and philosophy will probably end up in some odd combination of majors and minors :wink: Gotta love esoteric and random interests, eh? Of course, that will probably all change by the time I get to college, so who knows. I've got years to think it over. AP poly sci and environmental science this coming year should be able to help me refine my opinion in: is this really something I want to study in college? view post


posted 20 Jul 2004, 15:07 by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

Don't have much time to reply here, but here are some links for you: [url:bstxihkr]http://www.colorado.edu/English/ENGL2012Klages/pomo.html[/url:bstxihkr] [url:bstxihkr]http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/links/doi/10.1111/0018-2656.00123/abs/;jsessionid=afjRukWDDjxf[/url:bstxihkr] These should be enough to give you a certain general idea of what postmodernism attacks. For the record, I'm sympathetic toward most of the aims of po-mo, but I'm not "orthodox," due to certain stances I take in regards to the application of religion and value. view post


posted 20 Jul 2004, 15:07 by Grantaire, Moderator

Thanks! Quite fascinating..I'll have to check out some more stuff. view post


posted 20 Jul 2004, 15:07 by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

By no means an extensive list, here are some books you might need to read (don't worry, they're mostly intelligble ;)): Carlo Ginzberg, [i:gwt7mczp]The Cheese and the Worms[/i:gwt7mczp] (mircohistory of a certain heretical Italian peasant and how his beliefs reflect certain cultural uncertainties) Natalie Zemon Davis, [i:gwt7mczp]The Return of Martin Guerre[/i:gwt7mczp] - proof that history is indeed stranger than fiction. Michel Foucault, most anything, but especially [i:gwt7mczp]The Archaeology of Knowledge; The Order of Things; Discipline and Punish; A History of Madness;[/i:gwt7mczp] and works on counter-memory and language, sexuality, and religion and culture. These are some cultural history/po-mo critiques that should help you gain a wider understanding of the conflict po-mo causes in the historical field. And if you're really brave... Jacques Derrida, [i:gwt7mczp]On Grammatology[/i:gwt7mczp], at least for the anti-Preface preface ;) view post


posted 20 Jul 2004, 17:07 by Grantaire, Moderator

Well, what are the odds. I went to the bookstore a week ago, and I bought Foucaults Archaeology of Knowledge :D view post


posted 20 Jul 2004, 17:07 by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

Good start. But try to read his [i:3dgwyeyf]The Order of Things[/i:3dgwyeyf] just afterwards, so you can see how he changed his mind ;) view post


posted 20 Jul 2004, 17:07 by Grantaire, Moderator

I actually have some money in my pocket for once, so I'm carefully considering what all I should buy. (which is why I'm not immediately buying TDTCB, that would wipe out half of my money, I'm just going to wait till it's paperback, so it's a quarter of the cost). I'm thinking I'll probably pick up Mieville's The Scar, as well as some Foucalt and Derrida. I wish my library had more books of the sort, they have remarkably little philosophy and such, I need to interlibrary loan to get them. But Archaeology of Knowledge is next on my to read list, I'm working on a couple books right now. view post


posted 20 Jul 2004, 17:07 by Taliesin, Peralogue

Interesting.... I just bought [i:2sxdtqm0]The Order of Things[/i:2sxdtqm0] the other day w/ a gift card, as I've been wanting to read Foucault for a while, but never been brave enough.... view post


posted 20 Jul 2004, 17:07 by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

One of these days, I'm going to post my grad syllabi (and one I wrote for a proposed class) just to give you guys some excellent non-fiction to read. After all, I think my 90+ book recommended list might not be enough for the two of you ;) view post


posted 20 Jul 2004, 17:07 by Grantaire, Moderator

Haha, you ought to do that Larry. I still have yet to read the near 100 books recommended by OF to me, and I have a stack of science and philosophy books in my room to be read. But you really should. Your 90 books, plus the syllabi, that would be really interesting. I seem to be sort of naturally drifting towards non-fic anyway. view post


posted 20 Jul 2004, 18:07 by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

In lieu of me having to search for hours for everything, let me start by recommending two very different books for you to read: E.P. Thompson, [i:1ji6c34a]The Making of the English Working Class[/i:1ji6c34a] Modris Eksteins, [i:1ji6c34a]Rites of Spring[/i:1ji6c34a] One is THE seminal social history text, the other a fascinating cultural analysis of World War I. And speaking of WWI, read this book by one of my professors: Vejas Liulevicius, [i:1ji6c34a]War Land on the Eastern Front : Culture, National Identity, and German Occupation in World War I (Studies in the Social and Cultural History of Modern Warfare) [/i:1ji6c34a] This book has so many of the topics discussed in a seminar class I was in that I could almost recite the results even before he discussed them in the book. Great read. view post


posted 20 Jul 2004, 18:07 by Grantaire, Moderator

They sound excellent. See, I wish I could take classes in stuff like that! My school just had the basics, you know, like Modern World History, American History, Psychology, and Sociology. Nothing really specifically cultural like the things you speak of. I'll definately have to check them out, I'm going to the library later today. view post


posted 20 Jul 2004, 18:07 by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

Well, I didn't have most of these to read until I was in grad school, so what does that say for ya? ;) One of these days, I'm going to have to donate my history books to the local library, just so a curious person such as yourself can find and read them for enjoyment and education. view post


posted 20 Jul 2004, 18:07 by Grantaire, Moderator

Yep, I definately am getting a head start. Gotta love ambition :) If you donate them, you should send them up to my library 8) view post


posted 20 Jul 2004, 18:07 by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

I might just sort through them and mail them directly to you, if I do that ;) view post


posted 20 Jul 2004, 18:07 by Grantaire, Moderator

How many history books do you have? I know that's a problem with college, you buy tons of books, for hundreds of dollars, then often can't sell back many of them. Heh, I've already been taking some from my older brother when he comes back on breaks :wink: view post


posted 20 Jul 2004, 18:07 by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

Not for sure. I was (sad to say) broke much of the time and I sold most of my books back after the semesters were over, at least the ones I could get any money for. If I had to guess, maybe 100-150? And a lot of those are textbooks given to me by my graduate advisor when he retired, so probably only about 60-70 books of the sort I'm thinking about. view post


posted 20 Jul 2004, 18:07 by Taliesin, Peralogue

Larry, I think I've heard of the Thompson.... probably in my Brit Lit class last year. And, I hate selling books back. The last two semesters, I refused to sell any back, after regretting some of what I sold back my first year... maybe a balance between the two extremes would be better, but it's hard to know what I'll wish I had later.... especially when I keep changing and adding majors and minors.... view post


posted 20 Jul 2004, 18:07 by Grantaire, Moderator

Wow Larry, that's still a lot. I desperately need shelf space though :wink: my entire bookshelf is overflowing onto the floor. 60-70 is still a ton of books, I envy you! :P view post


posted 20 Jul 2004, 18:07 by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

Well, I had 9 bookshelves full of books, plus an extra 150-200 stacked on a closet shelf or on top of the other bookcases. Now I'm probably over a 1000 books and probably need to rent a Storage unit somewhere ;) view post


posted 20 Jul 2004, 19:07 by drosdelnoch, Subdidact

I did film and Media studies, my bros is now an art teacher and my sister has gone on to do an MA in English Lit. As to book shelves gave up after 3 of them and used them to build a book wall, lol only way I could stack them all and it doesnt half keep the room warm. view post


posted 20 Jul 2004, 20:07 by Grantaire, Moderator

haha dros, I certainly could use two more bookshelves! view post


posted 20 Jul 2004, 20:07 by Taliesin, Peralogue

My parents didn't like my recent comment that I could use another bookshelf..... view post


posted 20 Jul 2004, 20:07 by Grantaire, Moderator

Well I [i:2hng9zd1]realllly[/i:2hng9zd1] need one Taliesin, my current bookshelf is quite tall, has maybe 7 shelves, and they're all full (as in, I have two rows shelved on each, and many on top of them). It's starting to overflow onto my floor. Not a good situation :wink: view post


posted 20 Jul 2004, 20:07 by Taliesin, Peralogue

My situation isn't quite that bad, but close... and I have a huge box full of books in my closet as well. view post


posted 20 Jul 2004, 21:07 by Grantaire, Moderator

Yeah...another problem being that I doubt I could fit another bookshelf in my room. Oh well, maybe I should just pile them up under my bed and in the closet :wink: view post


posted 20 Jul 2004, 21:07 by Taliesin, Peralogue

All this talk of bookshelves is making me want to reorganize my books, as they are all just randomly placed at the moment.... Typically when I try to clean my room, all I end up doing is moving around the books. Shows where my priorities lie, huh? view post


posted 20 Jul 2004, 21:07 by Grantaire, Moderator

Ditto. Considering how randomly scattered they typically are, the last time I 'cleaned' my room ended up being me organizing my books onto different shelves. One for fantasy, one for sci-fi, one for science, philosophy, and reference, one for random fiction, etc. view post


posted 20 Jul 2004, 21:07 by Taliesin, Peralogue

Yeah, my last organizing was me clearing off the remaining shelf that didn't have books on it, and proceeding to fill it and more, since I had two long shelves' worth of books at school which I had to somehow fit in my room here.... But now I feel motivated - I think I actually am going to reorganize these books, and then my CD collection.... view post


posted 20 Jul 2004, 21:07 by Grantaire, Moderator

Laziness is a great motivator :wink: view post


posted 20 Jul 2004, 21:07 by Taliesin, Peralogue

I find procrastination to be the greatest motivator - I am amazed at how much work I can make myself do when it comes down to the last minute.... too bad I can't channel that energy and get work done earlier.... view post


posted 20 Jul 2004, 23:07 by Grantaire, Moderator

Yeah...procrastination works suprisingly well. Gotta love writing research papers 5 hours before they're due :D view post


posted 21 Jul 2004, 06:07 by Loof, Peralogue

Hehe nice subject derailing there :lol: Well due to being a professional slacker I still haven't gotten a degree. And since our school/university system is a bit different then the american I don't know exactly what to call everything. But Im starting a university program in Computer science this fall, I think it gives a masters in computer science and a batchelors in maths but im not sure. One big advantage with the subjects is I probably wont need 10 bookshelves to keep my studybooks :wink: view post


posted 22 Jul 2004, 23:07 by Clarkesworld Books, Peralogue

I have a Bacherlor's Degree in Computer Science. Someday I'll probably go and get a Masters in Instructional Technology. -Neil view post


posted 26 Jul 2004, 02:07 by Orion_metalhead, Auditor

im gonna be going to college for Music Production. i want to be a producer and sound tech. view post


posted 26 Jul 2004, 13:07 by drosdelnoch, Subdidact

Just wish I could redo my degree but I cant afford it. Too skint, still in a few years time I may just do that and get one in computer sciences just so the programming Ive taught myself will be recognised. view post


posted 26 Jul 2004, 17:07 by Sovin Nai, Site Administrator

That's cool Orion. I have been a sound tech all through middle and high school, as well as some private paid gigs. It's a sweet job, though not what I'm persuing. view post


posted 26 Jul 2004, 23:07 by Orion_metalhead, Auditor

yeah, im just hoping it will be able to support my extravagent life style. view post


posted 27 Jul 2004, 20:07 by Sovin Nai, Site Administrator

Don't know about that. You better sign on with someone big. What equipment do you prefer? view post


posted 29 Jul 2004, 03:07 by Orion_metalhead, Auditor

well, right now for my own music i use either an Ibanez bass or a Fender Bass with a 100 watt Ampeg amp. im sure of the model numbers. when i get a new laptop for college im gonna buy ProTools for recording since thats what most of the professionals use. though im fooling around with simple analog equiptment for my own band. view post


posted 29 Jul 2004, 17:07 by Sovin Nai, Site Administrator

Look into Samplitude. I use it for all of my recording. What sort of mixers and mics do you use? view post


A couple... posted 04 Aug 2004, 18:08 by Alric, Auditor

I currently have a BA in History and English. For History, I focused primarily on Roman and Early English history. With my current job, I get free tuition at the University of Minnesota, which will help in my plan to eventually get a MA and phD. Some day, I'd like to teach at a college level. Of course, I'd also like to be a writer, which I am working toward on a daily basis. I'm particularily drawn to writing historical fiction and historical fantasy, which shouldn't come as a big suprise. view post


posted 05 Aug 2004, 03:08 by steve, Peralogue

I would like to study history, it can be very interesting!! view post


posted 16 Aug 2004, 23:08 by Temeraire, Commoner

I'll be doing a combined honors major in Early Modern Studies and History. I''m not sure which period however, perhaps medieval and then revolutionary europe just to understand the full cause/effect of the Early Modern Period. Then it's onto the MA and PhD side of things immediatley after. I'll be shaking my head at my ambition soon enough. view post


posted 17 Aug 2004, 04:08 by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

Early Modern, huh? I did a dual focus concentration in Early Modern and 20th Century Cultural/Religious History for my MA (but no thesis) and if you want, I can recommend some wonderful books for that period. Nice to learn that there are more of us history major/grad student types around :D view post


posted 17 Aug 2004, 22:08 by drosdelnoch, Subdidact

The problem with history is that when I was at school we only got taught stuff that I thought was boring such as the industrial revolution. Now if I'd had Billy Connolly teaching me history I'd probably have stuck with it. I just like the way he conveys historical info to the viewer of his World Tour series. view post


posted 18 Aug 2004, 00:08 by Temeraire, Commoner

The Industrial Revolution, boring!? My friend, there can be nothing more exciting than squalid working conditions, sweaty 19th century people and the possibility of losing a limb to a cotton loom of death! But seriously... try Mark Williams' series on the industrial revolution. Very engaging. Aldarion, it's nice indeed to hear of a fellow EMS scholar. I'd love any recommendations you could give me! view post


posted 18 Aug 2004, 00:08 by Aldarion, Sorcerer-of-Rank

While I don't have my books in front of me, here are a few authors/books for you to consider: Natalie Zemon Davis, [i:3i8pw0fz]Fiction in the Archives[/i:3i8pw0fz] Davis, [i:3i8pw0fz]The Return of Martin Guerre[/i:3i8pw0fz] Carlo Ginzburg, [i:3i8pw0fz]The Cheese and the Worms: The Cosmos of a 16th Century Miller[/i:3i8pw0fz] Keith Wrightson, most anything. Christopher Hill, too many books to list here. Lyndal Roper, [i:3i8pw0fz]Oedipus and the Devil[/i:3i8pw0fz] I'll try to list more tomorrow - might head to my grandmother's, where I have my books stored. As for the Industrial Revolution, who can read E.P. Thompson's [i:3i8pw0fz]The Making of the English Working Class[/i:3i8pw0fz] or [i:3i8pw0fz]Customs in Common[/i:3i8pw0fz] and not think that there's a sad, tragic, and sometimes riotous story there? view post


posted 10 Sep 2004, 19:09 by eowyn1983, Peralogue

I'm doing an Honours B.A in Political Science and English right now...I may go on to grad school for political science or try get into the publishing field (I'd love to be the one who gets to read all of the books that are submitted :D ) and write on the side. view post


posted 14 Sep 2004, 02:09 by Scarred, Candidate

I will get my undergrad in Arts&Sciences with a political science minor, and my grad in law. view post


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