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dusted off in read-only

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French Edition of TDTCB posted 14 Jan 2005, 21:01 by Twayleph, Auditor

Hi Scott, first I'd like to say how much I appreciate your Prince of Nothing series. The Darkness that Comes Before and The Warrior-Prophet both "clicked" for me in a way that I could never have imagined ; these are arguably the novels that I found the most captivating because of the characters, the world, the intricate storyline and the philosophical elements. I can't wait for the rest of the series ; keep up the good work and please don't mess up TTT, because I've already pre-ordered it :) My question concerns the French edition ; I've waited for it for a while because I was really looking forward to see what the translators would do to TDTCB (the title in particular is very hard to translate). Do you know when this edition will be available in USA or Canada ? I would've ordered it from France, but the overseas shipping is very costy. view post


posted 14 Jan 2005, 22:01 by Cu'jara Cinmoi, Author of Prince of Nothing

Thank you Twaleph. I'm doing my best with TTT! I actually haven't sold the French-Canadian rights to the books, but I think it's definitely worth asking my agent about. I'll try to get back to you on this next week. view post


Autrefois les ténèbres... posted 06 Mar 2005, 15:03 by Tol h'Eddes, Auditor

Hi ! If you didn't know, the french title is Autrefois les Ténèbres - Le Prince du Néant tome 1. I know that they got it on amazon.ca, but not on chapters.indigo.ca. ISBN is : 226507943X And Fleuve Noir is the publisher (From France, I think). Would like to see if it's a good translation, though. Hope it'll help you ! [edit] typo correction... [/edit] view post


posted 06 Mar 2005, 16:03 by Cu'jara Cinmoi, Author of Prince of Nothing

Thanks Tol h'Eddes, and welcome to the board! Fleuve Noir only has French territorial rights. Amazon.ca is able to sell it because individual sales are exempt from those rights. That cover, though... I gotta tell you... view post


posted 07 Mar 2005, 15:03 by Tol h'Eddes, Auditor

Yes, and thanks to you to be part of this board. It's always a pleasure when an author takes time to discuss with his readers. :) As for the cover... I've seen better. And I prefer the one on the canadian trade paperback. I assume you don't have anything to say when it comes to the art on the book? view post


posted 07 Mar 2005, 15:03 by Cu'jara Cinmoi, Author of Prince of Nothing

Not with the Fleuve Noir, edition. The covers for the Overlook and Penguin Canada editions were actually my idea. Typically, though, publishers are careful to keep us yahoos as far from the art department as possible! How is the translation, by the way? view post


posted 10 Mar 2005, 20:03 by Tol h'Eddes, Auditor

[quote="Cu'jara Cinmoi":3uqo3lxj]Fleuve Noir only has French territorial rights. Amazon.ca is able to sell it because individual sales are exempt from those rights.[/quote:3uqo3lxj] Do you know if your french-canadian rights has been sold? Because I just saw a couple of copies of "Autrefois les ténèbres" in Indigo, at Montreal Thrust. By the way, the translation seems ok. I only read the prologue and the first two chapters, not having purchased the book yet. There was one or two times where a sentence was weirdly structured, as if it was a word by word translation. One sentence that comes back to mind is in the prologue, page 3 : "Was it murder when no one was left alive?" Was translated in : "Était-ce un meurtre lorsque personne n'était plus vivant?" Which, translated back in english, would be something like "Was it murder when nobody was alive any more?" The sentence, in french, would have been better if the translator had simply written something like : "Était-ce un meurtre lorsqu'il ne restait plus personne de vivant?" But, it may just be my old me, looking for bugs when there are none :) Overall, even with the cover, the book looks great and the translation, at least the first chapters, seems ok. One thing that puzzle me is that the french version only has 438 pages. Where did the 140 -or so- missing pages go? view post


posted 13 Mar 2005, 18:03 by Cu'jara Cinmoi, Author of Prince of Nothing

That is strange about the page count. Do you think some stuff was cut out? I STILL haven't received my author's copies... view post


Page count posted 13 Mar 2005, 21:03 by jacques, Commoner

Hi Scott and Hi to all, I'm the French translator of TDTCB, and I thought I'd answer this : [quote="Cu'jara Cinmoi":5v8ko4lw]That is strange about the page count. Do you think some stuff was cut out? I STILL haven't received my author's copies...[/quote:5v8ko4lw] The average page in the English edition has 34 lines, and the average page in the French edition has 46 lines. That's how one turns 590 pages into 460 ! Not a word was cut out. Guess you would have figured it out if you had received your author's copies, though, so I'll remind the publisher this week (gotta talk to her anyway.) Please feel free to contact me anytime, Best view post


posted 14 Mar 2005, 18:03 by Cu'jara Cinmoi, Author of Prince of Nothing

Jacques! Too cool! I have to tell you, I was relieved when I found out you would be doing the translation. I didn't think they gave you any small fry... :wink: You should let everyone know some of the other writers you've translated. view post


posted 14 Mar 2005, 21:03 by jacques, Commoner

[quote="Cu'jara Cinmoi":3kmj9roo]Jacques! Too cool! I have to tell you, I was relieved when I found out you would be doing the translation. I didn't think they gave you any small fry... :wink: You should let everyone know some of the other writers you've translated.[/quote:3kmj9roo] Hi again, And many thanks for the vote of confidence, Scott, it's much appreciated. For those on the board who could be interested, I've translated something like 150-200 books in the last 25 years, from the works of Alan Moore in comics to the biography of Ray Manzarek (in great part for the pleasure of translating Morrison's lyrics), from Design books to a new translation of the [i:3kmj9roo]Kama Sutra[/i:3kmj9roo]. In Heroic Fantasy, I've translated Tad Williams' [i:3kmj9roo]Memory, Sorrow & Thorn[/i:3kmj9roo], and I'm now alternating between translations of [i:3kmj9roo]The Prince of Nothing[/i:3kmj9roo] and Greg Keyes' [i:3kmj9roo]The Kingdoms of Thorn & Bone[/i:3kmj9roo]. I've just finished [i:3kmj9roo]The Charnel Prince[/i:3kmj9roo], so I'll most probably move on to [i:3kmj9roo]The Warrior-Prophet[/i:3kmj9roo]. Because I own and run my own publishing company, I now limit my translations to a few books I like, and can indeed afford to be picky, but I wouldn't have missed your work: in terms of immersing oneself in a world, translating a book is the next big thing to writing it, and [i:3kmj9roo]The Prince of Nothing[/i:3kmj9roo] is a delight. I guess everybody on this board will agree :D But enough of me ! view post


posted 15 Mar 2005, 00:03 by Tol h'Eddes, Auditor

Hey, cool, it's great to have the author and the translator here :) M. Collins, thanks for the info on the difference between french and english edition. By the way, I didn't want to criticize your work in my last message. I bought the french edition this week-end, have read half the book already, and the translation is great. I only hope the book will have as good visibility in french as it did in english. If I may ask you one or two questions... I would like to know a little more about your job. How do you pick the books you translate? Does it work by call for bids? When translating a book, is it chapter by chapter, from the beginning to the end? Or do you jump some chapters, returning to them later? Was TDTCB challenging to translate? Thanks! view post


translation posted 16 Mar 2005, 02:03 by jacques, Commoner

No problem with your earlier comment, and in any case, anybody should feel free to criticize - if there's anything wrong, Scott will want to know! And I'm certainly glad you like it now you've read more javascript:emoticon(':)') Now, about your questions: I translate from beginning to end, but I know some translators who would get a quick first draft and would then concentrate on the difficulties. No rules there. There's generally no call for bids, or interviews, or competition, because all editors in charge of a line of books would have their own pool of freelance translators, an opinion on each of them, and a fair idea from the beginning of which one would fit best each new book or series. So the editor will simply call the translator he's chosen and see if the translator he's chosen wants to do it and can fit it in his schedule. The more calls you get, the more picky you can be - but if you refuse an editor too often, you might not remain first on his list for long… javascript:emoticon(':)') That's mostly how it works once you're established. Starting in the business is a different thing entirely, but no real publisher would consider giving a 200,000 words translation to a beginner anyway. So, one begins by doing small translations for small publishers, learns his trade, and evolves towards more interesting things. So was TDTCB challenging? Every translation is a challenge: the bad books, because you have to finish them without considering suicide nor murder and still do a proper job, the good ones because you want the readers in your language to have the same pleasure they would have had if they had read the original. With a good book (and you've already guessed I place TDTCB in that category), the challenge is less with any linguistic difficulty than with being fair to the original style, and recreating its equivalent. (The works of different writers translated by the same translator shouldn't have the same style, obviously.) But if there's much more work, there's also much more pleasure: you literally take the time to appreciate each word, and to immerse yourself in that world. Starting the next volume of a series is like meeting an old friend. So yes, TDTCB was a challenge, linguistically and stylishly, but it was a great pleasure and I'm eager to get back there. And I will, very soon ! javascript:emoticon(':D') Hope I've answered your questions without getting too carried away, and thanks for asking. Feel free to ask again ! view post


posted 17 Mar 2005, 16:03 by Tol h'Eddes, Auditor

From what I read, I can see that translating is not only your work, but it's also a passion. When working on a serie, like Prince of Nothing, do you have a timetable to translate every book in it? Like, every book must be translated and published at a 1 year interval? And thanks for your reply :) It's always interesting to know how it works "behind the scene". view post


posted 18 Mar 2005, 16:03 by Cu'jara Cinmoi, Author of Prince of Nothing

That's a phenomenal number of books, Jacques - phenomenal! I'm just glad that mine made an impression! I hope this question isn't too impolite, but what factors determine the standard fee for a translation? view post


posted 22 Mar 2005, 16:03 by Tol h'Eddes, Auditor

Just convinced a local bookseller in Saguenay (a french-only speaking region in Quebec) to order a couple of copies d'Autrefois les ténèbres. He was surprised his resellers never spoke about the book, even more surprised to learn that it was from a canadian author. I only hope now that he will read it, recommend it to customers and that the book will not rest on the shelves. So, let's hope you'll become a known author here as well :) view post


posted 24 Mar 2005, 21:03 by Cu'jara Cinmoi, Author of Prince of Nothing

Thank you for spreading the (profane) word, TH! It's strange, because I don't think anyone has bought the French language Canadian rights to the books yet. I still haven't got all this figured out yet... view post


posted 05 Apr 2005, 00:04 by jacques, Commoner

[quote="Tol h'Eddes":3m7dvixc]From what I read, I can see that translating is not only your work, but it's also a passion. When working on a serie, like Prince of Nothing, do you have a timetable to translate every book in it? Like, every book must be translated and published at a 1 year interval? And thanks for your reply :) It's always interesting to know how it works "behind the scene".[/quote:3m7dvixc] Sorry it took me so long to answer. Yes, the translator has to follow a timetable, infamously known as the "dreaded deadline". You must have heard about it ! :) Meaning one has to deliver a finished translation by a certain date, much like a writer (production follows the same rules.) The original timetable is set by the editor, usually following the original timetable if the series is ongoing. In fact, the editor has to set a complete production plan (the book has to be translated, typeset, printed and distributed.) Then everybody involved is late! :)) But eventually, a book gets done, that's the marvel of publishing... view post


posted 05 Apr 2005, 01:04 by jacques, Commoner

[quote="Cu'jara Cinmoi":11tlg1y5] I hope this question isn't too impolite, but what factors determine the standard fee for a translation?[/quote:11tlg1y5] Sorry again for being late! No, there's no problem with the question. Not much to say, though: publishing is a small world long established, so everything is pretty standard. Editors know what they'll have to pay according to the level of quality they desire, and translators know what to expect from the kind of book they're offered. As a translator gains experience, he will get a better rate, but he'll also get faster and better, which has an even greater impact on his income. Sorry I don't have much to say on that subject, but conversations rarely go beyond "What's your usual rate?", both ways! :) By the way, I was at the Paris book fair and inquired about your copies. The editor will double-check, but copies should have been sent to your agent's representative in Paris, who'll mail them to your agent, who'll mail them to you. But if you still haven't seen it and don't feel like waiting for the whole process, email me a mailing address and I'll mail you a copy directly. view post


posted 07 Apr 2005, 21:04 by Cu'jara Cinmoi, Author of Prince of Nothing

They're probably somewhere in intertransit transit limbo then. I usually don't receive anything until long after I've forgotten I was supposed to receive something! I'll ask my agent if he's heard anything. Thanks, Jacques. view post


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